At the American Museum of Natural History specimen library with toucans collected in the 1920s by William Beebe. 

At the American Museum of Natural History specimen library with toucans collected in the 1920s by William Beebe. 

Currently, I am pursuing a doctoral degree within the history department at New York University. My research interests include environmental history and anthropology, political economy, postcolonialisms, U.S. empire and ecology, U.S./Latin American relations concerning conservation policies and ecological thought, and the ways popular culture and the scientific community produce, circulate, and translate information about ecology and evolutionary theory. 

Other areas of sporadic research include wild and domestic animal breeders in the United States, human interpretations of animal sexuality, evolutionary theories, the Galápagos and other iconic conservation areas, trash, deep-sea conservation policy, plastics, and swamp buggy culture in the Everglades.

 I have worked in numerous museums and cultural institutions, including the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum and the Bronx Zoo. I have lectured at the Brooklyn Museum on the use of animal imagery by contemporary artists and curated exhibitions about image production by early field biologists. I have been a resident at the Headlands Center for the Arts, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Mountain School of Arts. 


Recent Activity

Bathysphaera intacta circling the Bathysphere. Else Bostelmann c. 1934. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society Library and Archive. Use with permission only. 

Bathysphaera intacta circling the Bathysphere. Else Bostelmann c. 1934. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society Library and Archive. Use with permission only. 

 

Exploratory Works: Drawings from the Department of Tropical Research Field Expeditions opens at The Drawing Center in Manhattan on April 13th!

More information can be found at www.drawingcenter.org

The New York Times article about the show can be found here.

Smithsonian.com wrote an article about the show here

Co-curated by sculptor Mark Dion, Wildlife Conservation Society archivist Madeleine Thompson, and myself, this exhibition looks at the visual output of the Department of Tropical Research. Based out of the Bronx Zoo and led by naturalist William Beebe, this group developed innovative organizational methods of tropical field research and were the first to conduct comprehensive investigations of the ocean via manned deep-sea submersibles. They produced thousands of paintings and drawings for use as scientific and communicatory tools. This project brings the images together for the first time since the Department was disbanded in the mid-1960s and re-contextualizes their scientific and educational impact.